My Parisian Adventure – Day 4 (Palace of Versailles) + Final Day

When planning my trip, I knew I had to go and see The Palace of Versailles. There wasn’t any argument, so I decided I’d plan our holiday to centre around the day out.

I knew that Versailles was going to be an entire day out, and would require an early start and probably have a late finish, so we pre-packed our lunch and started out from the apartment early in the morning.10671454_896721550338024_1980962028170123782_n

From Jaures, we used Line 5 to take us to Paris Austerlitz, and from there we went on the Rer C to Versailles Rive-Gauche. From us, it was very easy. The Rer C is a separate system from the Metro, so you will have to buy a return ticket. Our Paris Visite Pass didn’t serve the Versailles or Disney lines. Currently it’s €3.55 for a one-way ticket. However, obviously purchasing a return journey will just be easier for when you leave. Be aware that the Rer C-Austerlitz line is currently partway closed due to maintenance, so alternative lines may be required. There are buses that also run from the city to the Palace.

Plan your trip here. – (There are a few stations that are situated around the Palace. I recommend the Versailles Chateau Rive-Gauche station, as it’s the closest to the palace)

It took around a hour from leaving the apartment to get to the Rive-Gauche station. From there, the Chateau is clearly signposted.

The Palace isn’t free to enter, and I found it better to book online before you arrive. It helps to cut down the queues. If you book online you don’t have to go to the ticket office (necessarily) and go straight to Entrance A.

We bought the €18 ‘Versailles Passeport’ which gives you access to the Palace, Gardens, Trianon and Marie-Antoniette’s Village. It also gives you access to exhibitions and the Fountains show. For the money, it was completely worth it.

For us, the queue wasn’t too long, but be aware there are quite strong security measures put it. Please visit the website to research and read up beforehand, so you aren’t caught out.

As this is the height of tourist season, it is very advisable to arrive early. We got to Palace at around 10am, and it was already very busy then. So, be prepared to experience some crowding, especially in the Hall of Mirrors. It isn’t advisable, or probably possible to stand around the rooms too long, as the amount of people makes it quite difficult.

Photography is allowed, but no flash, and not for commercial use unless authorisation is given. Selfie sticks are also banned, as are drones.

The entire palace is stunning. Gold leaf upon marble upon gold greets you in every room, and the Hall of Mirrors is ridiculously beautiful. When we went, there were so much to see it was quite overwhelming. You would definitely need more than a day to see the entire estate. My personal highlight was seeing Marie-Antoinettes Estate – a small hamlet built in a very typical F10351086_891388837537962_865758319822172331_nrench pastoral scene within the crowds, where the infamous queen used as a retreat from Palace life. It’s so quaint and beautiful, it’s definitely worth a walk around. 

When we went to the Palace, we were allowed to eat our picnic on the steps leading down to the palace gardens, which was a welcome highlight. There are clearly signposted refreshments around, and they offer a wide selection of food and drink for any palate. But remember, bring water to sustain you throughout the day, along with suncream on hot days. As a lot of the estate is stretched through the gardens, you spend a lot of time outside.

One tip that I have is that after spending the day walking around the estate, go back into the main palace at the end of the day. The crowds have thinned considerably, and you get to properly enjoy The Hall of Mirrors without being elbowed from all sides. The Palace closes at 6.30pm, so you have plenty of time to get back.

Be aware, the train back and into Versailles will always be crowded throughout the day. Be careful with belongings, and try and secure yourself a seat.

Versailles was definitely the highlight of the week. With the beauty and grandeur of the Palace mixing in with the fascinating history, it really is a day out that you won’t forget for a long time.

(Disclaimer – our fifth day of Paris was just seeing family, and despite a few hours spent walking up Champs-Élysées and a visit to Père Lachaise Cemetary, we didn’t take any images. So I’m going to end my Paris series here. Watch this space for my Rome adventure however!)

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My Parisian Adventure – Day 3 (Place de la Bastille, Notre Dame, Jardin des Tuileries and the Eiffel Tower)

Now, the third day of my holiday was definitely a very touristy one. Like I’ve said before, there were parts of Paris that I was very eager to explore and see with my own eyes.

So, I plotted out a route that would allow me to pass the majority of these sites.
So, after a good night sleep, we set out fairly early to go and see Place de la Bastille and start our day. As a history student, I studied the French Revolution and was very interested in the events that set off the Storming of the Bastille. So I naturally wanted to go there.
Now, in our experience during the week, the metro in Paris runs a lot like the London Underground. I cannot speak for the people living in Paris every day, but it seemed fairly reliable for us. 10615441_891399697536876_4881684208277563119_nWe walked the majority of the time, but used the metro to get to and from our apartment (which wasn’t particularly central, but close to Gare du Nord) as well as at the start and end of our holiday. We bought a Paris Visite pass, which gave unlimited transport for 3 days in the city itself.

To get to the Bastille, we used Line 5 from Jaurès, and ended up just circling the Place de la Bastille. Now, as the actual Bastille prison was destroyed in the Revolution, the area where it stood is just a plaza of traffic, shops and café. In the very centre of the plaza, The July Column commemorates the Revolution, and it was very interesting to see the Bastille stood all those years ago.
From there we travelled to Notre Dame. I’m not alone in thinking that a trip to Paris would be incomplete without a visit to this beautiful cathedral on the banks of the Seine. Now tied up with the story of Quasimodo and the Hunchback, Notre Dame is not only a world famous example of French Gothic architecture, but a site of high significance for the Catholic church.
The cathedral itself is free, but there are queues outside which can be around half hour long during peak times. During our visit, it never felt overly busy or crowded and you can take photos in the church. But beware! As with all touristy parts, the risk of pickpockets and muggers is higher here, so keep a very close eye on your personal belongings. 10626495_891398157537030_9217817442239124454_n
We spent around an hour in the cathedral, after which we walked around the outside and ate our lunch overlooking the Seine.
For our lunches, we chose to buy some simple pasta and sauces from the local shops, and load up on fruit and veg. It cut down the costs for us, and allowed us to cook in our little apartment. It also made buying food out quite a novelty.
After our lunch, we started the trek across Paris. All in all, we ended up taking a water break in the Jardins des Tuileries, before finally crossing the Pont Alexandre III and ending up at the Eiffel Tower. By sticking to the Seine, you get to see a lot of famous Parisian sights, such as the Grand Palais, Les Invalides and the Louvre, and get to see Paris unfold as you walk. The riverbank also has lots of little touristy gift stalls, cafes and seats, so you can restock on souvenirs and water as you continue on your journey.

During this holiday, we didn’t go up the Eiffel Tower, as we have both been up there before. But be aware, the queues for the tower can be ridiculously long and time-consuming. The tower attracts over 30,000 visitors a day, and advance tickets can be completely booked up to two months in advance. So, if you want to go to the Eiffel Tower during the day, the suggestion is go early morning or late evening. Also, the line for the elevators will always be busy, so take the stairs if you can. And like with Notre Dame, there are pickpockets and opportunistic thieves around, especially if you have cameras and bags. So just be careful.
We rounded off the day by crossing the Pont d’léna bridge and sat in the Jardins du T10703539_891395670870612_6869505743947458428_nrocadéro, feeling very French and indulging our weary bodies with a very sugary crepe. The Jardins are offer an unrivalled view of the Eiffel Tower, and with little stalls that sell ice-cream and crepes, you get to refuel after a busy day. Venturing up from the Jardins, we had a stroll around the Palais de Chaillot (a very modern looking building that now hosts a variety of museums) before catching metro back. From Trocadéro station back to Jaurès it meant changing from Line 9 to Line 5, and took around 40 minutes.
After this long, and very hot day out, we went down to Le Conservatoire and had very un-French meal of burgers and chips. However, this was the sort of fuel that was needed.
Like all major cities, you underestimate the sheer scale of Paris. I know it’s a lot smaller than some bigger metropolis’ such as London and New York, but to a tourist with very little knowledge about where they are going, getting lost and going back on yourselves makes the journey seem a lot longer. Paris also gets very hot in the summer, so I would definitely recommend stocking up on water and suncream. But on that particular day, taking the route we did, we did see a lot of the sights. The river is such a lovely walk, and I’d thoroughly recommend it to anyone who is going and wants to see a lot.

In this next installment, I’ll be describing our visit to Versailles. And what a day that was.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask!